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cpr, this is the original post that prompted my questions about CPR

Jago Miloguz japrak at gmail.com
Sat Oct 13 14:01:29 BST 2007


guidelines are clear when it comes to doing defib in witnessed arrest-one
should do it,and if not successful continue with cpr and if not
witnessed-prior to defib 1,5-3 minutes of cpr seems to improve ROSC
Ante

2007/10/8, Andrew J Bowman <andrewj.bowman at gmail.com>:
>
> It looks like they are discussing 2 issues.
>
> They start out talking about shocking VF patients in the first 30 seconds
> after arrest then switch to talk about doing CPR for longer down times.
>
> Apples and oranges.
>
> Need to compare..
>
> VF Witnessed
> Immediate Defib vs CPR then defib
>
> VF Unwitnessed
> Immediate defib vs CPR then defib
>
> Andrew
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Mike Smertka" <medic0947969 at yahoo.com>
> Subject: Re: cpr,this is the original post that prompted my questions
> about CPR
>
>
> > Should Rescuers Give CPR Before Defib?
> >
> > Barbara Turnbull
> > The Toronto Star
> >
> > In the critical moments after a heart stops, should paddle-wielding
> >  rescuers shock fast? Or slow?
> >
> > That's the life-or-death question a new, North America-wide study of
> >  nearly 15,000 emergency patients will try to answer. Researchers are
> >  examining the benefits of defibrillating victims within 30 seconds of
> their
> >  collapse in cardiac arrest, versus first performing three minutes of
> >  cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, before the shock.
> >
>
> >
> > When 74-year-old Mississauga resident John MacLean collapsed during a
> >  Leafs-Penguins overtime game at the Air Canada Centre last March, the
> >  capacity crowd was silenced and play was halted. Fortunately for
> MacLean,
> >  a nurse sitting nearby leapt to his aid and started CPR. He was
> >  resuscitated and taken to hospital, where he underwent triple-bypass
> surgery.
>
> In this case there was no defib available immediately so he needed CPR,
> but what if there was an AED "right there" then what. This study will not
> answer that.
>
> >
> > Traditionally, medical personnel would try to shock a collapsed victim
> >  as quickly as possible, sometimes within 30 seconds.
> >
> > "Now there is research that suggests maybe this isn't the right thing,
> >  maybe you shouldn't shock them right away; you should wait three
> >  minutes and be doing CPR," Dorian says, indicating recent studies in
> Seattle
> >  and Norway.
> >
> > "It turns out that when somebody has been unconscious for more than a
> >  couple of minutes and you shock their heart right away, the heart may
> >  not be ready to receive this electrical shock," he says.
> >
> > "The way to prime (the heart) is to do some minutes of CPR before you
> >  give the shock, so the heart ... will start to beat more effectively.
> > "But we don't know which is right," Dorian adds.
> >
> > Small, targeted studies of longer, pre-paddle defibrillation have had
> >  surprising outcomes, showing better survival rates. The results have
> >  made the large and random effort of PRIMED more important.
>
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