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What should I do ?

Mehmet ERYILMAZ mehmeteryilmaz at hotmail.com
Sun Oct 23 07:16:28 BST 2005


Hi all,

At last weekend we had an new earthquake (Richter 5.9) in İzmir,  west part 
of Turkey.
Fortunate nobody died, only some small number of people were injured.
What do you advice me after  any earthquake ıf  I  stay under press big 
stones and I am injured   ?
What should I do ?
What should I think ?
What should my thoughts be under limited area ?
What about my voice ?,  energy ?,
Can I manage my respiratuar rate ?
I'll be very happy ıf you share me your thoughts ?
Thanks?

Mehmet ERYILMAZ
Gülhane Military Medical Academy
Etlik 06018 Ankara
TURKEY








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Message: 1
   Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 10:57:04 -0500
   From: "Kostiuk, Ed M." <EdK at health.ok.gov>
Subject: US Capitol

Man in vehicle near US Capitol claims to have a vehicle bomb. Area being 
evacuated. Streets around the capitol are shut down.

All networks reporting

K


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Message: 2
   Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 11:21:54 -0400
   From: "Ronda Oberlin" <roberlin at ci.lansing.mi.us>
Subject: RE: Public Information

Making the message bigger and shinier may catch more eyes, but making people 
aware of hazards is only the first step. Awareness needs to be followed by 
intention to prepare and intention needs to be followed by action.

Intention and action rely on more complex factors than awareness: People's 
perceptions of their own capabilities--feelings of complacency vs. feelings 
of helplessness; whether or not they feel personal responsibility (residents 
in one area of our 100 year floodplain erroneously believe that the new 
stormwater system will protect them from riverine flooding and they don't 
need to prepare); whether they have the physical resources to act; how much 
they trust the source of the information, etc.

Public relations firms may well be better equipped to build a message to 
address this than we are, but we need to be aware that the breakdown isn't 
coming, for the most part, at convincing people that a hazard exists.

Getting the public to prepare is the same process as getting the public to 
respond to a warning. If we are not having any luck at the first one we 
should expect trouble when we give them the second.

The Australian Journal of Emergency Management had a good article on this in 
their February 05 issue.
http://www.ema.gov.au/agd/EMA/emaInternet.nsf/Page/AJEM


Ronda Oberlin, PEM CFM
Lansing Emergency Mgmt Office
815 Marshall
Lansing, MI 48912
517-483-4110

>>> "Bill Gross" <bgross at airmail.net> 10/20/05 09:17AM >>>
I continue to be amazed at our unwillingness to acknowledge delivering
message to the general public is a complicated task.  As emergency managers
we do go out a grab a highway map and draw squiggly lines on a map to demark
flood plains.  We turn to civil engineers and hydrologist.  Communicating
with the public is as complicated an issue.  The larger, more diverse a
jurisdiction, the harder it becomes to get a message understood.  One reason
emergency managers "do it in-house" is the fact that to get a well done
information campaign is a costly proposition.  It's hard to find the money
to do it when you are not offered much in the way of a budget increase year
to year.

What I am amazed to find is that there are a number of people who aren't
willing to admit they can't do.  Specially when offered the opportunity to
use grant money to hire a media relations firm  to do this kind of work.


-----Original Message-----
From: Emergency-Management at yahoogroups.com
[mailto:Emergency-Management at yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lloyd Colston
Sent: Thursday, October 20, 2005 5:29 AM
To: EM List; IAEM List
Subject: [EM] Public Information

As for the survey that says that 50% of people don't know where to turn
for planning information, the solution to that is public information.
Having regular public information announcements is important for keeping
your name in front of the public.   In fact, this weekend is a good time
to do a press release FULL of preparedness activity, as you call
Citizens to change their batteries in their smoke detectors when they
change the time on their clocks.

According to the Are You Ready (http://www.fema.gov/areyouready) book,
Citizens can get this information from the American Red Cross or us.

Are we so shy that we fail to engage the Citizen we serve?

-- 


Lloyd Colston             Mayes County Emergency Management
Pryor, OK USA           http://www.mayescem.us

"The President can make you a general, but only communications
can make you a commander."  General Curtis LeMay




-------------------------
>From the Emergency Management Group: 1,623 Members Strong.
Part of the All Hands Network http://www.all-hands.net/
Yahoo! Groups Links















-------------------------
>From the Emergency Management Group: 1,623 Members Strong.
Part of the All Hands Network http://www.all-hands.net/
Yahoo! Groups Links










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Message: 3
   Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 11:25:38 -0500
   From: "Kostiuk, Ed M." <EdK at health.ok.gov>
Subject: Open Source/Ontario CA Airport

Fake grenade causes evacuations at California's Ontario airport
Oct 21, 2005, 09:53 AM
ONTARIO, Calif. -- A fake grenade ended up being a major inconvenience for 
some travelers at California's Ontario International Airport.
Security screeners spotted the device packed in a suitcase yesterday 
morning. The owner told officers it was a car gear shift knob. But as a 
precaution, officials evacuated part of the terminal and called in the bomb 
squad to detonate it.
Eleven flights were delayed.
Some passengers missed flights and had to rebook. Travelers who had the 
chance to make later flights were whisked to the front of long security 
lines when the terminal reopened.
Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not 
be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Message: 4
   Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 14:55:43 -0400
   From: "Abdul Satar" <kc5fm at ureach.com> (by way of Lloyd Colston 
WX5EM/WQDE391 kc5fm at ureach.com)
Subject: Federal Government Readies for Hurricane Wilma

News Release
October 21, 2005
No. 05-346
Contact: FEMA Public Affairs (202) 646-4600


FEDERAL GOVERNMENT READIES FOR HURRICANE WILMA
FEMA Urges Preparedness



WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Department of Homeland Security is urging residents 
in Florida and along the Gulf Coast to pay close attention to the guidance 
of state and local officials and make preparations now.



"A top priority going into the weekend is that residents of Florida and the 
Gulf Coast are watching the progress of the storm and listening very closely 
to the instructions of state and local officials," said David Paulison, 
acting Director for FEMA. "While Hurricane Wilma has slowed down, it is 
still a strong storm, and people should take this opportunity to make sure 
they are preparing their homes and families for this storm."



FEMA stands ready to support Hurricane Wilma response in any way that may be 
needed.  FEMA is pre-positioning supplies and commodities in the surrounding 
areas of potential landfall, if needed by state and local authorities. 
Federal hurricane preparedness measures and other potential Federal support, 
if needed, is outlined below.



The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has deployed a team to monitor the 
storm’s progress and coordinate federal activity.  The Homeland Security 
Operations Center (HSOC) in Washington, D.C., is in constant communication 
with regional and national operations centers to maintain complete 
situational awareness.  Homeland Security components are providing further 
support.

FEMA is pre-positioning over three hundred truckloads of water, ice and 
meals at Homestead Air Force Base and the Jacksonville Naval Air Station in 
Florida to be distributed at the request of the state.  FEMA has logistics 
centers located around the country to pull additional resources if needed.

Four Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) teams and one Incident Support Team are 
deployed to pre-stage in Miami and Orlando.  Two teams are on alert at their 
home bases.

Nine Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (DMATs) are deployed to pre-stage in 
Orlando.  Nine more National Disaster Medical System teams are on alert at 
their home bases.

Communications support equipment, tower trailers, computers, cell phones, 
and a Mobile Emergency Operations Vehicle are being moved into the region. 
Three Mobile Emergency Response Systems (MERS) communication teams are ready 
to support coordination and response activity in Atlanta, Tallahassee and 
Orlando.

The U.S. Coast Guard is conducting C-130 over flights ahead of the storm 
looking for mariners in harms way, broadcasting radio warnings alerting 
mariners of the storm’s approach, and directing that port facilities in the 
storm's projected path implement their hurricane preparedness plans. 
Additionally, the Coast Guard is pre-staging aircraft and cutters for 
immediate response into the area after the storm passes, placed its 
environmental response and deployable security teams on standby, and 
dispatched liaison personnel to the Florida state emergency operations 
center in Tallahassee and the FEMA command center in Atlanta.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is relocating 1200 detainees from 
Florida to Arizona and Texas as a precaution for the safety and security of 
all detainees and ICE personnel.  Nearly 50 Federal Protective Service 
personnel will pre-position to provide protection for federal assets, such 
as federal buildings and courthouses.  They stand ready to provide law 
enforcement and security support if needed.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is providing public service announcements 
about food safety to help minimize the potential for food-borne illnesses 
due to power outages or flooding.  Satellite feeds are available through the 
Department of Agriculture today.

The U.S. Department of Defense has deployed Defense Coordinating Officers 
and a Defense Coordinating Element to the Florida state emergency operations 
center as well as NORTHCOM planners to FEMA national headquarters.  DOD has 
provided eight helicopters for the potential evacuation of citizens or 
transport of equipment and seven communications teams.

The U.S. Department of Energy has sent staff to FEMA’s Regional Response 
Coordination Center (RRCC) in Atlanta, and their visualization and modeling 
team is prepared for Hurricane Wilma’s arrival.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has 1000 beds prepared for 
deployment in case Florida requests use of Federal Medical Shelters (FMS). 
An additional 1000 beds are readily available.  The United States Public 
Health Service Commissioned Corps has placed a clinical strike team of 
healthcare professionals on alert.  The HHS volunteer program has 
credentialed more than 200 physicians and 400 registered nurses ready to be 
deployed if needed.  The Strategic National Stockpile maintains substantial 
quantities of pharmaceuticals and medical supplies ready for quick shipment 
if needed.

The U.S. Department of State has issued warnings to American citizens to 
avoid travel to or depart from parts of Mexico and from Cuba where the 
hurricane is predicted to hit.  The Department of State has also approved 
departure for non-emergency personnel at the U.S. Interests Section in 
Havana, Cuba.

The U.S. Department of Transportation has provided 89 power units and trucks 
to transport 89 loads of commodities.  Transportation’s Federal Highway 
Administration is currently conducting planning calls with their Evacuation 
Liaison Team in case assistance is needed by the state.

The Environmental Protection Agency has pre-deployed personnel to regional 
coordination centers and is identifying On-Scene Coordinators to support 
local hurricane response.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation field offices in Miami, Tampa and 
Jacksonville are operating 24 hours a day and are prepared for requests for 
law enforcement assistance as needed.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation advises banking customers and 
bankers who may be affected by the hurricane and in need of up-to-date 
banking information to call the FDIC’s 24-hour hotline, 1-877-ASK-FDIC.

The General Services Administration’s USA Services Program stands ready to 
provide citizens with access accurate answers via phone and on the web. 
Contingency plans are in place to ensure uninterrupted service from the 
National Contact Center, 1-800-FED-INFO.  FirstGov.gov has updated resources 
tracking the course of Hurricane Wilma and providing emergency preparedness 
information.

The American Red Cross has relief supplies and personnel pre-positioned 
throughout Florida ready to respond.

Individual Preparedness



Following is a list of actions that individuals should undertake and 
supplies to gather before Wilma’s anticipated landfall.



Before a Hurricane Strikes:

Plan a safe evacuation route and identify safe shelter space within your 
area.  Those in storm surge zones, in flood zones, or in less than standard 
housing should be especially vigilant in preparing disaster plans.


Have disaster supplies on hand, including:

Nonperishable food and water (including a non-electric can opener)
Flashlight, portable battery-operated radio and extra batteries
First-aid kit
Essential prescription medicines
Cash and credit cards
Sturdy shoes and a change of clothing
Copies of important papers (bank statements, insurance records, 
identification cards, etc.)

When a Hurricane Watch or Warning is Issued:

Listen to hurricane progress reports.  Follow instructions if ordered to 
evacuate.
Check your emergency supplies.  Store drinking water in clean bathtubs, 
jugs, bottles and available cooking pots.
Bring in outdoor objects such as lawn furniture, toys and garden tools; 
anchor objects that cannot be brought inside but that could be wind-tossed.
Secure your home by installing hurricane shutters or precut plywood.
Trim dead branches from trees.
Turn the refrigerator and freezer to the coldest settings if not instructed 
by officials to turn off utilities.
Fuel your car.  Review evacuation routes and gather your disaster supply 
kit.
Store valuables and personal papers in a waterproof container.
Review your family disaster plan.

If You Are Told To Evacuate:

Leave as soon as possible.  Avoid flooded roads and watch for washed-out 
bridges.
Secure your home.  Unplug appliances and turn off electricity and the main 
water valve.  If time permits, elevate furniture to protect it from flooding 
or move it to a higher floor.
Take your pre-assembled emergency supplies and warm, protective clothing.


Water Safety Tips:

Stay off the water. The Coast Guard's search and rescue capabilities and 
degraded as storm conditions strengthen. This means help could be delayed. 
Boaters are urged to heed to weather watches, warnings and small craft 
advisories. People should not go out on their boats 48 hours prior to and at 
least 72-96 hours after a hurricane has passed through an area.


Evacuate as necessary. If mandatory evacuations are set for an area, the 
public is urged to heed to these evacuation orders. Coast Guard personnel 
and other emergency responders may not be able to evacuate those in danger 
during the storm.


Secure your belongings. Owners of larger boats are urged to move their boats 
to inland marinas where they will be less vulnerable to breaking free of 
their moorings or damage. Trailerable boats should be pulled from the water 
and stored in a place that is not prone to flooding.
·        Stay clear of beaches. Even the best swimmers can fall victim to 
the strong waves and rip currents caused by Wilma Swimmers are urged to stay 
clear of beaches until local officials say the water is safe.

For more information on emergency preparedness, please visit www.ready.gov 
or www.fema.gov.



FEMA prepares the nation for all hazards and manages federal response and 
recovery efforts following any national incident. FEMA also initiates 
mitigation activities, trains first responders, works with state and local 
emergency managers, and manages the National Flood Insurance Program and the 
U.S. Fire Administration. FEMA became part of the U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security on March 1, 2003.



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Message: 5
   Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 12:20:14 -0700 (PDT)
   From: Bob Robinson <rwrobinsonme at yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Open Source/NRP

--- "Kostiuk, Ed M." <EdK at health.ok.gov> wrote:

> DHS Didn't Use Part of Natl. Response Plan for
> Katrina (  <http://www.govexec.com> Government
> Executive) "The Homeland Security Department did not
> use a plan for handling catastrophes in its response
> to Hurricane Katrina, even though some officials say
> that doing so could have saved lives and brought the
> chaotic situation in New Orleans under control,"
> reports Government Executive. "The department didn't
> activate a section [the Catastrophic Incident Annex]
> of the National
>
<http://www.dhs.gov/interweb/assetlibrary/NRP_FullText.pdf>
>  Response Plan that deals specifically with
> responding to catastrophes ...
-------------------------------------------------------
Ed,

>From what I have heard, neither Homeland Security
Secretary Michael Chertoff nor FEMA Director Michael
Brown were aware of that annex, and, those within FEMA
who were aware of it were not at a level to be able to
interact with either of those gentlemen or their
immediate staff.  At least that is what I heard, via
word of mouth from those in a position to know, and
since it is just word of mouth, take it with a grain
of salt. It does seem, however, to fit with the
over-all confusion that ruled in the first 36 hours of
response.

Regards,

Bob Robinson




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Message: 6
   Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2005 13:17:22 -0700
   From: "Michael Teague" <mjteague at comcast.net>
Subject: Doctors Say Katrina Showed WMD Response Failings

Doctors Say Katrina Showed WMD Response Failings
By Joe Fiorill
Global Security Newswire
WASHINGTON - Hurricane Katrina showed that the United States must improve
its medical response plans for a nuclear or biological attack, emergency
doctors told a House of Representatives subcommittee yesterday (see GSN
<http://www.nti.org/d_newswire/issues/2005/10/19/a9c116e5-43c2-4be7-a742-ac9
663630e25.html> , Oct. 19).
The response to Katrina included a comparatively small medical component but
still strained the medical system, leaving hospitals and other facilities
understaffed and underequipped, said the witnesses. Fifty disaster teams
dispatched by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, senior committee
Democrat Bennie Thompson (Miss.) added, saw their effectiveness limited by
inadequate federal coordination of their work.
Such weaknesses could prove deadly in the much larger medical response to a
WMD attack, the experts told the Homeland Security Prevention of Nuclear and
Biological Attack Subcommittee.
"Katrina exposes systemic problems in local, state, federal and military
response coordination - problems that will be much more severe and have much
more negative outcomes in the event of a terrorist attack in multiple
cities," said National Defense University technology and security researcher
Donald Thompson, a medical doctor.
The doctors presented the subcommittee with scores of suggestions for
improvement, including heightened federal ability to act without waiting for
a state's request and stronger coordination of hospitals' work during an
attack or other disaster.
Hypermed Inc. President Jenny Freeman, a surgeon who is part of a National
Disaster Medical System team, described the experience of colleague Tim
Crowley, who resigned from another federal team in frustration after
returning from his post-Katrina deployment in Louisiana.
"As a thoughtful and competent physician who wound up in a command position,
the disorganization that prevented him from providing useful patient care
was highly problematic," Freeman said. "Over and over again, he saw
physician and medical resources squandered. His team remained in Baton
Rouge, being told there was no mission, while the staff at the key West
Jefferson location were crying for help."
Like the other witnesses at the hearing, Freeman called for a stronger
federal hand in disaster response planning and execution.
"There is a genuine need and role for NDMS in responding to a disaster, and
it is the role of the federal government to provide the guidance, support
and impetus for this mission to occur," she said. "Until we have clear,
rational and accurate guidance as to what we as medical professionals will
be required to train and prepare for, we will all act as individuals, doing
the best we can in an extremely suboptimal manner, and the result will
continue to be significant injury and death."
University of Texas public health-emergency expert Richard Bradley, who is
emergency medicine director at Lyndon Baines Johnson General Hospital in
Houston, said local governments' authority in crises could be strengthened
to improve hospital performance. Local emergency managers, he said, are
responsible for overall emergency response but have no authority over
hospitals and doctors.
"The emergency manager . is responsible for ensuring hospital care is
available but has no authority over the hospitals to compel them to
respond," Bradley said. "It is clearly in the public interest to address
this problem at a national level."
Local governments, Bradley said, should draw up memorandums of understanding
with hospitals that cover staffing, bed distribution and other procedures in
a crisis. Authority to invoke the memorandums' provisions should rest with
emergency managers, he said.
Committee members and witnesses expressed frustration about what they called
continued ambiguity in the lines of authority laid out in the new National
Response Plan, which is intended to guide disaster response at all
government levels. In a bid to better coordinate general and medical
emergency preparedness, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff has
created a specific Preparedness Directorate in his department and has hired
a chief medical officer.
Thompson and top subcommittee Democrat James Langevin (R.I.) wrote Chertoff
a letter yesterday questioning whether Homeland Security is prepared for an
epidemic of a disease such as avian influenza. The lawmakers requested
elaboration of the national plan's Biological Incident Annex, which governs
both naturally occurring and maliciously initiated outbreaks.



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Message: 7
   Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2005 02:00:16 -0000
   From: "Tom" <tom.balint at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: Open Source/NRP

There are two parts to the Catastrophic Incident Annex, the annex in
the NRP and the Catastrophic Incident Supplement (NRP-CIS).  I have
never seen the "final" version of the NRP-CIS, does anyone know if
it was "finalized?"  If not, was there a more recent version than
the November 2004 version?

--- In Emergency-Management at yahoogroups.com, "Kostiuk, Ed M."
<EdK at h...> wrote:
>
> DHS Didn't Use Part of Natl. Response Plan for Katrina (
<http://www.govexec.com> Government Executive) "The Homeland
Security Department did not use a plan for handling catastrophes in
its response to Hurricane Katrina, even though some officials say
that doing so could have saved lives and brought the chaotic
situation in New Orleans under control," reports Government
Executive. "The department didn't activate a section [the
Catastrophic Incident Annex] of the National
<http://www.dhs.gov/interweb/assetlibrary/NRP_FullText.pdf>
Response Plan that deals specifically with responding to
catastrophes ... According to standard NRP protocols, state and
local governments are in charge of responding to a disaster.... The
Catastrophic Incident Annex, however, gives the federal government
special powers, including the ability to bypass state governments.
But Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff or one of his
designees has to approve use of the annex. That was not done during
Hurricane Katrina. Instead, the federal government and state of
Louisiana got caught up in negotiations over what kind of federal
assistance would be provided in the first few days after the storm
hit." [ View article <http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?
articleid=32586&dcn=todaysnews> ]
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>






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Message: 8
   Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2005 10:34:02 -0500
   From: Lloyd Colston <kc5fm at ureach.com>
Subject: FEMA Media Advisory

Contact: FEMA Public Affairs   202-646-4600


NEXT FEMA HEADQUARTERS BRIEFING ON HURRICANE WILMA PREPARATIONS SCHEDULED 
FOR SUNDAY AT 2:30 PM

Washington, D.C. - The Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency 
Management Agencys (FEMA) next FEMA headquarters briefing for media on 
continued Hurricane Wilma preparations will be Sunday, Oct.23 at 2:30 p.m. 
EDT.

What: Next FEMA Headquarters Hurricane Wilma Briefing
When: Sunday, October 23, 2005
2:30 p.m. EDT
Where: FEMA Headquarters
500 C Street, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20472

For live television coverage of the briefing at 2:30 p.m. EDT Sunday, 
October 23, tune to the following coordinates:
SBS 6
Ku Analog
Transponder 5
Downlink 11823 Horizontal

To LISTEN ONLY to the 2:30 p.m. EDT briefing, call 1-800-320-4330, pin 
number 051397.


For more information on the media briefing call the FEMA News desk, (202) 
646-4600.


FEMA prepares the nation for all hazards and manages federal response and 
recovery efforts following any national incident. FEMA also initiates 
mitigation activities, trains first responders, works with state and local 
emergency managers, and manages the National Flood Insurance Program and the 
U.S. Fire Administration.  FEMA became part of the U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security on March 1, 2003.

-- 


Lloyd Colston             Mayes County Emergency Management
Pryor, OK USA           http://www.mayescem.us

"The President can make you a general, but only communications
can make you a commander."  General Curtis LeMay



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


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