Login
Site Search
Trauma-List Subscription

Subscribe

Would you like to receive list emails batched into one daily digest?
No Yes
Modify Your Subscription

Modify

Home > List Archives

Libby Zion & NON-fatigue

trauma-list@trauma.org trauma-list@trauma.org
Tue, 4 Jun 2002 08:33:38 EDT


--part1_b8.28698f9c.2a2e0da2_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 6/3/2002 10:39:38 PM Central Daylight Time, 
Krin135@aol.com writes:


> Starting with the Libby Zion Case back about 1987-88 in NY, there is a 
> substantial body of research now that shows that there is a trade off 
> between time on the job and time learning new things.
> 
> 

I suggest that EVERYONE on this web site go back and do research on the Libby 
Zion case.   The problem with that case was CONTINUITY OF CARE and HANDOFF 
when there were too many residents, taking too little call, and lack of going 
to the patients bedside when a nurse called.  THe resident who had basically 
just gotten on duty gave a verbal order for a patient (Libby Zion) she did 
not know, had never seen, and was unaware of the other medications that the 
patient was on.  This medical resident was not sleep deprived, but used 
fatigue as her defense in the subsequent court case.    THe rest of the story 
is history.   New York then used this fatigue issue to put a lot of incorrect 
urban legend material in the press.    

k

--part1_b8.28698f9c.2a2e0da2_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 6/3/2002 10:39:38 PM Central Daylight Time, Krin135@aol.com writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#408080" style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Black" LANG="0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><I>Starting with the Libby Zion Case back about 1987-88 in NY, there is a substantial body of research now that shows that there is a trade off between time on the job and time learning new things.<BR>
<BR>
</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Black" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE></I><BR>
</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"><BR>
I suggest that EVERYONE on this web site go back and do research on the Libby Zion case.&nbsp;&nbsp; The problem with that case was CONTINUITY OF CARE and HANDOFF when there were too many residents, taking too little call, and lack of going to the patients bedside when a nurse called.&nbsp; THe resident who had basically just gotten on duty gave a verbal order for a patient (Libby Zion) she did not know, had never seen, and was unaware of the other medications that the patient was on.&nbsp; This medical resident was not sleep deprived, but used fatigue as her defense in the subsequent court case.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; THe rest of the story is history.&nbsp;&nbsp; New York then used this fatigue issue to put a lot of incorrect urban legend material in the press.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>
<BR>
k</FONT></HTML>

--part1_b8.28698f9c.2a2e0da2_boundary--